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a meal perfect for catching up

Desi, one of my closest friends from high school, was my first official guest in my new home. After her, my mom came up for the 4th of July weekend. And now, everything is back to the way it was, but I do have lots of photos to share from all the cooking that ensued. First, Desi:

After a 3-year gap without seeing each other, we seamlessly picked up right where we left off. It was beautiful; we were laughing and joking as though we had seen each other the night before.

One of the things I forgot to mention about Desi is that she is also quite the lover of food. Her only request for dinner that evening was that we make some kind of fresh pasta. No big deal; in fact, it was brilliant. Ever since I read my friend Afaf’s Sheesh Barak post, I’ve been meaning to blog about it myself. If you’ve had this Middle Eastern pasta-like dish before, you know perfectly well how delicious it is. Sheesh Barak (شيش برك) is essentially meat-filled dough slowly cooked in a refreshing yogurt sauce infused with garlic and mint. It takes time, it takes patience, but when you’re making it with people you love, none of that matters.

Caboose (the dough that could)

basic semolina pasta recipe: 1 egg for every 100 grams of semolina flour, a pinch of salt, to taste, and a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil is optional. Mix the ingredients together and knead until a smooth ball of dough is formed (if too firm, add a little bit of luke warm water; if too soft, dust with a little more flour). Cover the dough in plastic wrap and allow to rest for 30 minutes. The dough is then ready to roll and be used as desired.

I guess you could, theoretically, use Won Ton wrappers if you were craving sheesh barak and were running short on time; but, for the sake of delicious food and a good time, I suggest opening a bottle of wine, inviting some friends over and going through the wonderful sheesh barak experience.

mise en place

The ingredients for this dish are pretty standard. Nothing you wouldn’t be able to find in your local market. I’m convinced, however, the gossip that goes on while Middle Eastern women crowd around a table to make these types of involved Middle Eastern dishes adds something special to the dish.

Middle Eastern Gold

Allspice has got to be one of the most commonly used spices in Middle Eastern cooking. They sprinkle it over hard-boiled eggs, use it to season their poultry – they even add it as a garnish for some of their dishes. Because of how often I use it myself, I keep a large jar of whole allspice in my pantry and grind it small batches to preserve its freshness.

meat & onion love

The meat filling couldn’t be simpler. You’ll want to chop the onions finely and cook them in a little olive oil until translucent. After five minutes or so, add the meat, salt and allspice and cook until most of the moisture in the pan evaporates. My dad is notorious for sneaking into the kitchen at this point and helping himself to some of this meat mixture, which he’ll scoop into a warm pita pocket and sprinkle with some of the toasted pine nuts my mom reserves for garnishing.

filling the dough

You can shape your sheesh barak a different number of ways. I personally like the tortellini shape because it creates a perfect little nook for extra yogurt sauce to sit in. Desi went so far as to cross the arms, which make them look even cuter, but I’ll leave that detail up to you.

plan for leftovers

For the sauce you’ll want to mix together a tiny bit of cornstarch, an egg, the yogurt and place the mix over medium heat. Add the sheesh barak and slowly bring the sauce to a simmer. The egg and the cornstarch are there as stabilizers so that the yogurt won’t separate, but to be on the safe side, make sure not to apply high heat as it could ruin the suace. In a separate skillet you’ll want to quickly sauté the garlic and dried mint in some extra virgin olive oil and add it to the sheesh barak.

Sheesh Barak (شيش برك)

For garnish I like to use some more of the dried mint, a bit of spicy ground red pepper and toasted pine nuts. Saha wa hana (صحة و هنا) bon appetit!

Sheesh Barak

yiels 4-6 servings

Components

  • 1 lb ground beef or lamb
  • 1-2 medium onions, finely diced
  • 2-3 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tbsp allspice, ground
  • 300 g fresh pasta dough
  • 24 oz plain yogurt
  • 1/2 tsp cornstarch
  • 1 egg
  • 2 tbsp dried mint
  • 2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • salt, to taste
  • pine nutes, toasted for garnish

Putting them all together

  1. Make pasta dough and set aside (recipe in post).
  2. Cook the onions in extra virgin olive oil over medium heat until translucent, approximately 5-7 minutes. Add meat, allspice and salt and cook over medium high heat until most of the liquid in the pan has evaporated.
  3. Once the meat mixture has cooled, roll out the dough. Make tortellini, ravioli or your favorite pasta shape.
  4. For the sauce, mix the yogurt, cornstarch, and egg in a large sauce pan. Add the sheesh barak and place over medium heat. Stir occasionally to make sure the sauce does not separate.
  5. In a separate pan, sauté the garlic and dried mint until fragrant. Mix into sheesh barak.
  6. Garnish with some more dried mint, a little spicy ground red pepper, and toasted pine nuts.

Print

Posted in entrees, Middle Eastern, recipe, savory by Antonio Tahhan on July 10th, 2009. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.


15 Responses to “a meal perfect for catching up”

Simply Heaven Says:

W-O-W!!! Your shish barak is so authentic, looks absolutely delicious!
Awesome job Tony!
xoxo

Soma Says:

I never had this before, the end result looks stunning! & with the pictures, the making of pasta does not look all that difficult.

Arlette Says:

WOW Tony, what a nice and yummy Sheish Barak you
prepared for us… Sahtein Ala Kalbak…
you used corn flour like me.. I toast my Sheesh Barak in the oven for couple of minutes to give them some color and crunchy taste.
Wonderful step by step photos ,
thanks for sharing a wonderful meal

Antonio Tahhan Says:

shukran, shukran ya Arlette.
I wish you and everyone from Walima could’ve been here to enjoy it with me.
After I posted my recipe I stumbled across Joumana’s sheesh barak post on Taste of Beirut, and she toasts hers as well.
(http://www.tasteofbeirut.com/?p=1520)
I’ll have to give that method a try – I can’t wait :)

Wheels Says:

I’m in love with the idea of this; and unfortunately don’t eat meat. If I wanted to try a vegetarian version, would you have any suggestions for a substitute stuffing to maintain or capture the essence of the dish? I’m open to fish, egg and dairy combinations as well as vegetarian ones.
Thanks!

joey Says:

This is the first time I’ve come across this dish and it sounds wonderful! I can just imagine how delicious it would taste!

Navita Says:

Hi Tony, long time no see…how have u been?

Loved the SHEESH BARAK..like all your other creations. :)

I just adore your pics…no wonder a pic is worth a thousand words! My favs are the table of ingredients. :)

Peter Says:

Tony, your pasta making skills are awesome and this dish is new to me and I’d love to try it.

Sarah Says:

Afaf also inspired me with her lovely sheesh barak recipe. Yours is more traditional and I would love to try it. My first taste of sheesh barak was in Jish, a muslim/christian Arab town in the Galilee. Very impressed with photographing every step.

Update « Can I Have Some More Mum Says:

[...] Ravioli Sauce (adapted from here) [...]

Walima Cooking Club tour Lebanon :Aysh el-Saraya and Sheesh Barak | Health Foods Blog Says:

[...] infused with flavors of garlic and mint. Adapted from Recipes at Simply Heaven food and Antonio Tahhan Basic Dough or Ajeen for making the [...]

Marie Says:

Hi, I’ve just come across your blog and am going to try the shish barek. My kids love this type of food. Do you have a recipe for tis-ee-ah. My husband has a craving for this old world peasant dish he used to eat around Damascus. Basically its chickpeas with an oil,water,base sauce where oil and water actually combine. Do you have such a recipe? I’d really appreciate finding out how to make it. Thanks

Julie Says:

How long do you “cook” the pasta in the sauce…till they float??

ayman Says:

thank you chef


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